Catalina Island

First Fridays at the Museum” Begins Friday with a Film Screening

Sun Tunnels 1973-76 Site: The Great Basin Desert in Northwestern Utah, about 4 miles southwest of Lucin (pop. 10) and 9 miles east of the Nevada border. Dimensions: Total length: 86 ft. Tunnel length: 18 ft. Tunnel diameters outside: 9 ft. 2-1/2 in. Tunnel diameters inside: 8 ft. Wall thickness: 7 1/2 in. Orientation: The tunnels are aligned with the sun on the horizon (the sunrises and sunsets) on the solstices. Each tunnel has a different configuration of holes corresponding to stars in four constellations: Draco, Perseus, Columba, Capricorn
Sun Tunnels 1973-76
Site:The Great Basin Desert in Northwestern Utah, about 4 miles southwest of Lucin (pop. 10) and 9 miles east of the Nevada border.
Dimensions: Total length: 86 ft.; Tunnel length: 18 ft.; Tunnel diameters outside: 9 ft. 2-1/2 in.;
Tunnel diameters inside: 8 ft.; Wall thickness: 7 1/2 in. Orientation: The tunnels are aligned with the sun on the horizon (the sunrises and sunsets) on the solstices. Each tunnel has a different configuration of holes corresponding to stars in four constellations:Draco, Perseus, Columba, Capricorn.

June 27, 2016, AVALON, CATALINA ISLAND – The Catalina Island Museum introduces a new tradition tomorrow night, July 1, with its inaugural “First Fridays at the Museum.” The first Friday of every month the public is invited to an evening of wine and other refreshments in the Catalina Island Museum’s new Ada Blanche Wrigley Schreiner Building. A film screening is the centerpiece of this Friday’s event, but other “First Fridays” will include music and dance performances, lectures and guided tours. Tonight’s film is the recently released documentary “Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art,” which begins at 8:00 p.m. Troublemakers unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s when a cadre of renegade New York artists sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale. They chose bulldozers instead of brushes to create art in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest. The film includes rare footage and interviews that reveal the enigmatic lives and careers of such artists as Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative); a headstrong troika that established the genre and who stand in marked contrast to the hyper-speculative contemporary art world of today. The Wall Street Journal has described the film as one “that takes its place among the great art documentaries of the past half-century… filled with great moments, large and small…deftly captures the madcap ambition, grandeur and even sublimity of the works these artists created.” The museum opens for this event at 6:00 p.m. and the film begins at 8:00 p.m. in the Schreiner Family Plaza. Tickets for First Fridays at the Museum are $7 for members of the museum and $12 for non-members. Tickets may be purchased online at CatalinaMuseum.org or at the door. Your ticket includes one complimentary beverage. Wine, beer, soda and water will be available for purchase. Outside snacks are permitted during this event. The Catalina Island Museum is Avalon’s sole institution devoted to art, culture and history. Open seven days a week from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the new Ada Blanche Wrigley Schreiner Building is located in the heart of Avalon at 217 Metropole Avenue. For more information, the museum may be reached by phone at 310-510-2414 or at its website: CatalinaMuseum.org.

Photo: Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels, 1976 © Holt Smithson Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York