Catalina Island

Catalina: The Wild Side Art Show Draws Art Fans to Balboa Works of 10 Nationally Recognized Plein Air Painters Featured Island Scenes

John Cosby, holding his painting, “Afternoon Dip,” was one of the 10 plein air painters to participate in the Catalina Island Conservancy’s Catalina: The Wild Side Art Show in Balboa on Oct. 23. With him are two of the show’s attendees Frank Tarquin and Kathy Gann. Photo by Robb Rosenfeld.
John Cosby, holding his painting, “Afternoon Dip,” was one of the 10 plein air painters to participate in the Catalina Island Conservancy’s Catalina: The Wild Side Art Show in Balboa on Oct. 23. With him are two of the show’s attendees Frank Tarquin and Kathy Gann. Photo by Robb Rosenfeld.

 

BALBOA, October 27, 2016 – Art lovers crowded the Newport Harbor Yacht Club on Sunday for the Catalina Island Conservancy’s Sixth Annual Catalina: The Wild Side Art Show, where they admired and purchased the works of the 10 nationally recognized plein air artists who showcased their interpretations of Catalina Island’s wildlands, Avalon and Two Harbors. This year, four new participants in the show – artists Brian Blood, Laurie Kersey, Kathleen Dunphy and Debra Huse – joined the roster of returning artists, John Cosby, Don Demers, Andy Evansen, Kim Lordier, Ron Rencher and Matt Smith. “Thanks to the artists as well as the Catalina Island Conservancy supporters and art lovers who joined us, Catalina: The Wild Side Art Show was another successful event to support the Conservancy’s unique use of art for conservation’s sake,” said Tony Budrovich, Conservancy president and CEO. Proceeds from the sales of the artworks on Sunday benefit the Conservancy’s conservation, education and recreation programs, and support the Conservancy’s permanent collection of plein air art that documents the organization’s conservation efforts and progress in habitat restoration. Many of the paintings acquired during previous shows are on display for the public in the Conservancy’s Nature Center in Avalon Canyon. Most of the artists traveled to Catalina Island many times to paint in the plein air style, which is art created in the outdoors. When Kersey and her artist husband, Blood, were painting on Catalina Island near El Rancho Escondido earlier this year, she said that “it was so peaceful that I remember hearing the flapping of bird wings as a couple flew overhead.” About the Conservancy: Formed in 1972, the Catalina Island Conservancy is one of California’s oldest land trusts. Its mission is to be a responsible steward of its lands through a balance of conservation, education and recreation. Through its ongoing efforts, the Conservancy protects the magnificent natural and cultural heritage of Santa Catalina Island, stewarding approximately 42,000 acres of land and more than 60 miles of rugged shoreline. It provides an airport and 50 miles of biking and nearly 150 miles of hiking opportunities within its road and trail system. The Conservancy conducts educational outreach through two nature centers, its Wrigley Memorial & Botanic Garden and guided experiences in the Island’s rugged interior. Twenty miles from the mainland, the Island is a treasure trove of historical and archaeological sites. It also contains numerous rare and endangered animals and plants. The Island is home to 60 species – and counting – that are found only on Catalina. For additional information, please visit www.catalinaconservancy.org.